<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; url=https://r.sealevelrise.org/https://sealevelrise.org/states/"/> Find your state's sea level rise - Sea Level Rise

 

When it Comes to Sea Level Rise,
Not Every State is the Same

Enter Your State

Though sea level rise and flooding are increasing in all coastal communities across the United States, the increase is at different speeds. Select a state below to find out about how the historical rate, forecast, causes, and solutions are different in each.

Select Your State
Sea Level Rise National Map
Inches of Sea Level Rise Since 1950
East Coast
East Coast

On the East Coast, the sea is rising by about one inch every three years. Though there are many contributors to sea level rise, each state faces individual challenges unique to its location. For example, while ice melt and the slowing of the Gulf Stream are the two greatest contributors to Florida’s sea level rise, they only contribute to a small portion of Virginia’s sea level rise, which is mainly caused by sinking land.

Gulf Coast
Gulf Coast

On the Gulf Coast, sinking land and the slowing of the gulf stream are affecting sea level rise the most. However, each state is is affected by additional contributors, such as ice melt or thermal expansion. For example, while sinking land causes the majority of sea level rise in both Alabama and Texas, Alabama is also heavily impacted by ice melt and Texas is not.

West Coast
West Coast

On the West Coast, sea levels are increasing at a slower pace than the national average because the land is actually rising due to shifting tectonic plates. Sea level rise on the West Coast is particularly impacted by ice melt from Alaska and, to a lesser-extent, Greenland, as well as climate patterns like the El Niño.